30 Years of KW

 

KUNST-WERKE BERLIN e. V., the support association of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art and the Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, turns 30.

 

To mark its anniversary, KW invites artists to revisit the institution’s seminal role in the production and dissemination of contemporary art with a year-long program of exhibitions and special commissions, an art auction, an elaborate publication, and a celebratory weekend in its courtyard and neighborhood.

 

On this dedicated page, you can dive into the anniversary of KW.

 

 

<p>Kunst-Werke Berlin before the renovation, Berlin 1991; Photo: Uwe Walter</p>
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Kunst-Werke Berlin before the renovation, Berlin 1991; Photo: Uwe Walter

 

 

Program

 

For its 30th anniversary, KW will unveil a series of new commissions from January 15 onwards. Complementing this program, a major two-part art auction will take place in June and December 2021. The annual program’s key event will be a weekend-long celebration on July 2 – 4, 2021, featuring an extensive program of events, performances, and the launch of the first publication retracing KW’s history.

 

In the interest of everyone’s safety, we kindly ask you to inform yourselves about the current COVID-19 hygiene measures and precautions when visiting our exhibitions and events.

 

 

<p>Jimmy Robert, <em>Joie noire</em>, Performance with Courtney Henry at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2019, Berlin; Courtesy the artist; Photo: Frank Sperling</p>
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Jimmy Robert, Joie noire, Performance with Courtney Henry at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, 2019, Berlin; Courtesy the artist; Photo: Frank Sperling

 

 

Commissions

 

Alongside its exhibition program, KW Institute for Contemporary Art is continuously pushing beyond the confines of the physical building through its commission program. Throughout the years, these commissions have taken on numerous formats. These commissions are produced in order to present a different temporality and dedication to art production, in which the environment and architecture of both institutions—KW and the Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art—is challenged.

 

For its 30th anniversary, KW has commissioned works by artists Susan Philipsz, Katharina Sieverding, as well as by Sissel Tolaas, all mirroring aspects of the history of KW.

 

 

<p>Katharina Sieverding,<em> Deutschland wird deutscher</em>, 1993, as part of the exhibition Katharina Sieverding. <em>Deutschland wird deutscher</em> by Kunst-Werke Berlin, 1993; Courtesy the artist; Photo: Jens Ziehe</p>
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Katharina Sieverding, Deutschland wird deutscher, 1993, as part of the exhibition Katharina Sieverding. Deutschland wird deutscher by Kunst-Werke Berlin, 1993; Courtesy the artist; Photo: Jens Ziehe

 

 

Exhibition Archive

 

Reflecting its pivotal role in the production, display, and dissemination of contemporary art, KW will in the course of 2021 look back on three decades of exhibitions and events, which established it as a pioneering space for progressive practices within the Berlin and international art scenes, and significantly contributed to the development of Berlin as an international center for contemporary art.

 

Here you can browse through KW’s exhibition archive.

 

 

<p>Cyprien Gaillard, <em>The Recovery of Discovery</em>, 2011, Installation view at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin 2011; Photo: Uwe Walter</p>
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Cyprien Gaillard, The Recovery of Discovery, 2011, Installation view at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin 2011; Photo: Uwe Walter

 

 

 

30 Years in Images

 

In its thirty years, KW has considerably shaped the development of contemporary art by critically examining current tendencies and discourses within society. Through its avant-garde program of exhibitions, commissions, and multidisciplinary events, which feature distinctive collaborations with artists and institutions, KW has aligned itself with, and innovatively steered, national and international art and cultural discourses—and it continues to do so today.

 

<p>Berlinde De Bruyckere, <em>lichaam (corpse)</em>, 2006; Installation view of the 4th Berlin Biennale at Old Garrison Cemetery, Berlin 2006; Courtesy Berlinde De Bruyckere; Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing; Hauser & Wirth, Zurich / London; Photo: Uwe Walter</p>
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Berlinde De Bruyckere, lichaam (corpse), 2006; Installation view of the 4th Berlin Biennale at Old Garrison Cemetery, Berlin 2006; Courtesy Berlinde De Bruyckere; Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing; Hauser & Wirth, Zurich / London; Photo: Uwe Walter

 

 

Publication

 

For the anniversary year 2021, the first publication retracing the history of KUNST-WERKE BERLIN e. V. will be published. Previously inaccessible material as well as the memories of contemporary witnesses will be included in the publication. From today’s perspective, it is explored what role the KW has played and continues to play in the local and international cultural landscape from their beginnings in post-reunification Berlin until today.

 

The publication will be published by DISTANZ and is generously supported by Volkswagen AG and KW Freunde.

 

More information on the publication will be announced soon.

 

<p>Philippe Van Snick, <em>Dag/Nacht</em>, 1984–ongoing, Installation view entrance gate, KW Institute for Contemporary Art; Courtesy Tatjana Pieters; Photo: Frank Sperling</p>
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Philippe Van Snick, Dag/Nacht, 1984–ongoing, Installation view entrance gate, KW Institute for Contemporary Art; Courtesy Tatjana Pieters; Photo: Frank Sperling

 

 

Berlin Biennale

 

The Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art was founded in 1996 through a private initiative. Since the 1st Berlin Biennale, which was curated by Klaus Biesenbach as artistic director together with Nancy Spector and Hans Ulrich Obrist in 1998, the Berlin Biennale has been taking place every two years on the premises of KW Institute for Contemporary Art as well as at several locations in the city of Berlin.

 

<p>Team of the 1st Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (from left to right): Klaus Biesenbach, Ulrike Kremeier, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Nancy Spector, Douglas Gordon, Miriam Wiesel, Jens Hoffmann, Daniel Haaksman; Photo: Jens Ziehe</p>

Team of the 1st Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art (from left to right): Klaus Biesenbach, Ulrike Kremeier, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Nancy Spector, Douglas Gordon, Miriam Wiesel, Jens Hoffmann, Daniel Haaksman; Photo: Jens Ziehe